Making the Future Female

Posts tagged “police

HISTORY OF WIKILEAKS DOCUMENTARY


Impressive and important Swedish documentary on

TOP DOCUMENTARY FILMS

about the growth, people and philosophy of Wikileaks

a must-see…

http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/wikirebels/


New documentary explores accusations against Julian Assange


http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/sex-lies-julian-assange/

Latest documentary from TOP DOCUMENTARY FILMS on the Julian Assange sex allegations containing interesting new details.


Smile – you’re on Scandal Camera


WARNING – THIS IS NOT SATIRE

The police chief who co-ordinates the growing network of more than 5,000 roadside cameras, which records the whereabouts of 16m vehicles, said the network was patchy and left “large gaps in coverage in various parts of the country”.

Police made the admissions as they won a FOI tribunal to keep secret the locations of the the cameras, arguing that disclosure would allow criminals to evade detection.

For the past 10 years, police chiefs have pushed the expansion of the network, saying the cameras have become one of their most valuable tools to catch criminals in investigations ranging from terrorism to children dropping litter.

The cameras, located on motorways and main roads and at airports and town centres, automatically record the number plates and fronts of cars, noting the time, date and location of the images taken.

Each camera, be it fixed on a pole, gantry or mounted in a police car, can log up to 3,600 images an hour.

The images are transmitted to a central database in Hendon, north London, which holds more than 7bn records of the movement of stretching back six years. Police hope the database will be able to record up to 50m licence plates a day.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/aug/27/police-number-plate-cameras-network-patchy

The roads were empty when Linda Catt and her father drove their white Citroën Berlingo into London on a quiet Sunday morning. They could not have known they were being followed.

But at 7.23am on 31 July 2005, the van had passed beneath an automatic number plate recognition (ANPR) camera in east London, triggering an alert: “Of interest to Public Order Unit, Sussex police”. Within seconds Catt, 50, and her 84-year-old father, John, were apprehended by police and searched under the Terrorism Act.

After filing a complaint, the pair, neither of whom have criminal records, discovered that four months earlier, a Sussex police officer had noticed their van “at three protest demonstrations” and decided, apparently on that basis, it should be tracked. The two anti-war campaigners were not the only law-abiding protesters being monitored on the roads.

Officers have been told they can place “markers” against the vehicles of anyone who attends demonstrations using the national ANPR data centre in Hendon, north London, which stores information on car journeys for up to five years.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2009/oct/25/surveillance-police-number-plate-recognition?INTCMP=ILCNETTXT3487

A national apparatus has been created for dealing with so-called “domestic extremists”, a category of political activist that has no legal basis.

Working under the auspices of the Association of Chief Police Officers, three barely-known police units receive £9m to help monitor protesters across the country.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/oct/26/kingsnorth-protests-climate-change-campaign?intcmp=239


‘Arrest under all circumstances’: Police plan to capture Assange revealed in photo


Oops,,,



There’s more of us than you…


Is Torture Still Illegal?


Torture is a brutal attempt to destroy a person’s sense of dignity and sense of human worth.  It acts also as a weapon of war, spreading terror beyond its direct victims to communities and societies.

States must take effective legislative, administrative, judicial or other measures to prevent acts of torture in any territory under their jurisdiction.  There are no exceptional circumstances whatsoever — whether a state of war, or a threat of war, internal political instability, or any other public emergency or national security situation.  States’ obligations also include the duty to provide effective and prompt redress, compensation and rehabilitation for all torture victims.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s message for the International Day in Support of Victims of Torture,  26 June 2012

And yet in the Guardian we read:

“Detainees who claimed they had been tortured were treated dismissively by officers at Dover immigration removal centre, prisons inspectors have said. Reports by officers at the Kent centre lacked photographs, body maps and judgements on whether scarring matched alleged abuse, inspectors found.”

Compare this response to how government officials act on terrorism and organised crime, yet torture is illegal in any circumstances under international law. The UK Government’s attitudes are disgusting and illegal under law.

Click here to see this blog’s author discuss the issue in a debate at Coventry University.


Careful with that Tweet – Old Bill is Listening…


Police and prosecutors in the UK have been accused of being “incredibly heavy-handed” when dealing with online trolls and abusive messages.

It follows several cases where young people have been arrested, fined or jailed after posting insulting comments on their Twitter and Facebook accounts.

Campaign groups and experts from Oxford University say the punishments are heavier than in other countries.

Paul Chambers, 28, was fined £1,000 for tweeting “joke” about blowing up airport in Sheffield. The verdict was overturned in June 2012 BBC

According to the Campaign Against Censorship, jokes or sarcasm are often misread, especially when people only have 140 characters.

Index, which campaigns for freedom of expression, say such cases are “silly” and the police only pursue them because they are “easy prosecutions”.