Making the Future Female

Posts tagged “Simon of Peraea

NO EVIDENCE OF JESUS


I’ve just watched a short film entitled

The First Jesus

This what it’s about…

He was called the King of the Jews, believed to be a Messiah. Just before Passover, the Romans beheaded him and crucified many of his followers outside Jerusalem.

But his name was not Jesus… it was Simon, a self-proclaimed Messiah who died four years before Christ was born.

Now, new analysis of a three-foot-tall stone tablet from the first century B.C., being hailed by scholars as a “Dead Sea Scroll on stone,” speaks of an early Messiah and his resurrection.

Was Simon of Peraea real? Did his life serve as the prototype of a Messiah for Jesus and his followers? And could this tablet shake up the basic premise of Christianity?

Watching this film reminded me of the real Dead Sea Scrolls.

The initial discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, by Bedouin shepherd Muhammed edh-Dhib, his cousins Jum’a Muhammed and Khalil Musa, took place between November 1946 and February 1947.

Eventually a total of a collection of 972 scrolls were recovered, consisting of texts from what is now known as the Hebrew Bible, or the Old Testament, and extra-biblical documents found on the northwest shore of the Dead Sea, from which they derive their name.

They were specifically located at Khirbet or Qumran in what was then British Mandate Palestine, and since 1947, what has been known as the West Bank.

The texts, and coins found with them, have been dated to the centuries immediately before and after when Jesus was supposed to have lived.

When these discoveries were first made, the Catholic Church thought there may well be evidence of Jesus and his teachings but that wasn’t the case. Some have argued that the church immediately set about suppressing this knowledge.

According to the texts, the men of Qumran fervently believed in a doctrine of last things. They fled to the desert and were readying themselves for the imminent judgment, when their enemies would be vanquished and they, God’s elect, would be given final victory in accordance with the predictions of the prophets.

However, the evidence shows that they actually believed in three messiahs— a prophet, a priest and a king.

Dr. Will Varner – Professor of Old Testament at The Master’s College and Director of IBEX, the college’s campus in Israel.

Yet no mention whatsoever is made of Jesus or John the Baptist in all these texts.

Doesn’t this seem unlikely if Jesus was the person Christianity claims?

The only reference to Jesus at all can be found in the writings of the Roman historian Titus Flavius Josephus (37 – c. 100), and that was written some decades after the period.

And there’s no evidence in Roman archives, yet the Romans were known for their administration.