Making the Future Female

Posts tagged “UK government

Paralympic Games Competitor Sacked


Hours before the Paralympic Games opening this evening a poignant protest was made yards from the stadium by a former medal-winner – who’s just been sacked from Remploy.

The hypocrisy of the government which was red-carpeting disabled athletes while throwing loyal Remploy workers on the dole was exposed before the world.

GMB member Brian Davies won four swimming medals at the 1982 Oslo Paralympic Games but lost his job a fortnight ago when the Remploy factory in Wigan closed.

It is just one of 27 factories being closed by the government by the end of the year throwing more than 2,000 workers on the dole, about 1,700 of them disabled.

A further nine factories face an uncertain future. The remaining 18 sites are due to close or be sold-off next year.

Outside Stratford rail station Mr Davies was joined by Remploy workers also facing the sack who gave out leaflets to passing members of the public.

Since the announcement of the closures was made – called by many the government’s most unkindest cut of all – there has been a massive wave of public support at protests, demos and strike picket lines.

Further protests are planned including a week of strike action from Monday at Chesterfield and Springburn in Glasgow.

GMB national secretary Phil Davies said: “If some axe-grinding disabled charities had their way and followed their own logic there would be no Paralympic Games – since they would be branded as segregated.

“It was this dogmatic logic that led them to call for Remploy factories to be closed on the grounds that segregation was demeaning.”

http://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/news/content/view/full/123238


UK Cabinet to Star in New Disney Movie


Yes readers – remember where you heard the news first…


Is Torture Still Illegal?


Torture is a brutal attempt to destroy a person’s sense of dignity and sense of human worth.  It acts also as a weapon of war, spreading terror beyond its direct victims to communities and societies.

States must take effective legislative, administrative, judicial or other measures to prevent acts of torture in any territory under their jurisdiction.  There are no exceptional circumstances whatsoever — whether a state of war, or a threat of war, internal political instability, or any other public emergency or national security situation.  States’ obligations also include the duty to provide effective and prompt redress, compensation and rehabilitation for all torture victims.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s message for the International Day in Support of Victims of Torture,  26 June 2012

And yet in the Guardian we read:

“Detainees who claimed they had been tortured were treated dismissively by officers at Dover immigration removal centre, prisons inspectors have said. Reports by officers at the Kent centre lacked photographs, body maps and judgements on whether scarring matched alleged abuse, inspectors found.”

Compare this response to how government officials act on terrorism and organised crime, yet torture is illegal in any circumstances under international law. The UK Government’s attitudes are disgusting and illegal under law.

Click here to see this blog’s author discuss the issue in a debate at Coventry University.


Is Torture Still Illegal?


Torture is a brutal attempt to destroy a person’s sense of dignity and sense of human worth.  It acts also as a weapon of war, spreading terror beyond its direct victims to communities and societies.

States must take effective legislative, administrative, judicial or other measures to prevent acts of torture in any territory under their jurisdiction.  There are no exceptional circumstances whatsoever — whether a state of war, or a threat of war, internal political instability, or any other public emergency or national security situation.  States’ obligations also include the duty to provide effective and prompt redress, compensation and rehabilitation for all torture victims.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s message for the International Day in Support of Victims of Torture,  26 June 2012

And yet in today’s Guardian we read: “Detainees who claimed they had been tortured were treated dismissively by officers at Dover immigration removal centre, prisons inspectors have said. Reports by officers at the Kent centre lacked photographs, body maps and judgements on whether scarring matched alleged abuse, inspectors found.”

Compare this response to how government officials act on terrorism and organised crime, yet torture is illegal in any circumstances under international law. The UK Government’s attitudes are disgusting and illegal under law.

Click here to see this blog’s author discuss the issue in a debate at Coventry University.


It’s Justice – but not as we know it Jim…


The British so-called government is planning to introduce secret trials which could themselves be kept secret under legislation before the Lords.
The UK government would be able to apply to the courts for a case to be held in closed material proceedings (CMP) under the Justice and Security Bill.

The government could present evidence under CMP to a judge without the defence having a right to challenge it or even being aware of the nature of the evidence.

These plans of secret trials have been widely condemned by human rights lawyers and civil liberties groups as an attempt by the UK government to place itself and the security services above the law.

PRESS TV

Justice? Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha